Friday, December 07, 2012

On Molly Gloss and "The Grinnell Method"

Over at io9, I have a piece about Molly Gloss and her story "The Grinnell Method," published at Strange Horizons in September.  As I write there, Gloss is a writer whose style and preoccupations should make her a perfect fit for fans of, among other authors, Karen Joy Fowler, and "The Grinnell Method" in particular reminds me a great deal of Fowler's "What I Didn't See."  Which is to say that it's an excellent story, and that I hope to see it getting more attention as we move into award season.  Click over to io9 to see why.

5 comments:

Alison said...

Thanks Abigail. It is a treat to discover a new writer that I am sure I will like: I suppose it's 'Incidental, Accidental, Rare'.

Alison said...

Thanks Abigail. It is a treat to discover a new writer that I am sure I will like: I suppose it's 'Incidental, Accidental, Rare'.

Nimrod Hod said...

Thanks. Reading this story had been a continuing suprise. I want to read more from this author. What do yo recommend?

Abigail Nussbaum said...

Hi Nimrod,

I mention several of Gloss's novels in the article. Of those, the one that is probably most like "The Grinnell Method" is Wild Life, about a pioneer woman who goes looking for a lost child and possibly finds Bigfoot. I also enjoyed The Hearts of Horses, about a young female horse-trainer in the early 20th century (which is not SFnal at all), and The Dazzle of the Day, about life on a generation starship crewed by Quakers.

Of course, what I'd really love to be able to recommend is a collection of Gloss's short fiction, but for that, we need an enterprising publisher to pick up the gauntlet...

Tito said...

I love how dense the story was. The tone was perfect, and does not betray where the story is heading. With writers such as Fowler, McHugh and Gloss, fiction, and not just science fiction, has finally come of age. We have need for a Literature that takes into consideration everything: Nature, animal life, the environment included, and now we have it. This was an extraordinary read.

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